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Welcome to this week's edition of the Computer Kindergarten Newsletter.
Today is Sunday, January 18, 2015

In this Issue:
Special Feature: Better Business Bureau Tips to Avoid Scams In 2015
Special Feature: Update to Windows 8.1 from Windows 8
Special Feature: How to Upgrade to Mac OS X Yosemite
Today's Topic: Speed Up a Slow Computer - Uninstall Unused Programs
Special Feature: iPad: Some New Features in iOS 8 - Safari
Websites of Interest: Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Special Feature: The Better Business Bureau Offers Tips to Avoid Scams In 2015

With 2015 in full swing, individuals have begun working on New Year’s resolutions such as eating healthier, getting organized or finding a new job. The Better Business Bureau suggests adding the resolution to be savvier about scams to that list.

Scammers are constantly devising new tricks and refining old ones, according to a release from the BBB. BBB of Upstate New York offers these resolutions to help people stay safe from scammers:

Keep computer programs and passwords up-to-date. Reminders to update your Internet browser, operating system and other software may be annoying, but shouldn’t be ignored. Keeping programs current is a great defense against malware. Software manufactures continually update programs to protect against the latest viruses.

To create strong passwords, combine lowercase and capital letters with a mix of numbers and symbols. Write passwords down, but don’t store this cheat sheet on a computer.

Guard personal information. Identity theft is one of the fastest-growing crimes in the nation. Do not give credit card or bank account numbers, your date of birth, Social Security number, insurance information or driver’s license number over the telephone. Any personal information given out, including name, address and telephone number, may be shared with a third party and expose people to fraud so it’s important to ask questions or read privacy policies online about how companies share information.

Keep devices safe. Take the same precautions on mobile devices as on a computer. Protect phones and tablets with a passcode, keep software up-to-date and watch out for malware disguised as apps.

Know the telltale signs. A little common sense goes a long way in spotting scams. Watch out for anything that’s too good or sensational to be true. This covers everything from “free” gifts to instant job offers to scandalous celebrity videos. Be skeptical of any communications riddled with typos and poor grammar. If there is any doubt, check it out first.

Don’t act immediately and do research first. Most scams urge individuals to act right now, before there is a chance to consider other options. Always be sure to do research. Depending on the occasion, this can be anything from refraining from clicking links sent to via email, getting three contractor quotes or performing a quick online background search about a business or charity. Don’t be pressured into a commitment.

For scam alerts, tips and other information, visit www.bbb.org, like the BBB on Facebook and follow on Twitter.

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Special Feature: Update to Windows 8.1 from Windows 8

From microsoft.com

Windows 8.1 build on Windows 8, to bring you enhancements in personalization, search, apps, the Windows Store, and cloud connectivity, and has the security and reliability features you expect from Windows. It's fast and made to work on a variety of devices—especially on the new generation of touch devices.

If your PC is currently running Windows 8, it's free to update to Windows 8.1. And unlike previous updates to Windows, you'll get this update from the Windows Store.

There are a few things you should do before you start installing.

Back up your files. Although your files and apps come with you when you update to Windows 8.1, it's a good idea to make sure that your files are backed up first.

Plug in your laptop or tablet. It's important to keep your PC plugged in throughout the update process, because if you lose power before it's done, the update might not install properly.

Connect to the Internet. It's best to stay connected until the update is done. If you don't, you’ll need to connect again to finish setting up later, and setup will take longer.

Get the latest critical and important updates. There are some updates you might need before you can install Windows 8.1. In most cases, the latest updates will be installed automatically using Windows Update. But if you don’t have automatic updates turned on and you need to check for updates manually, or if you'd like to check to see when the latest updates were installed, you can do this from Windows Update. For more info, see Windows Update: Frequently asked questions.

Temporarily turn off your antivirus program. Some antivirus software might interfere with the installation. After you install Windows 8.1, remember to turn your antivirus program back on.

Now you can download the free update from the Windows Store.

Go to the Start screen, and tap or click the Store tile.

In the Store, tap or click the Windows 8.1.

Tap or click Download.

The update will download and install in the background while you use your PC to do other things. The installer will check to make sure you have enough disk space, that your apps and devices will work with Windows 8.1, and that you have all the required updates.

In some cases, the installer might find something you need to take care of before you can continue installing the update. If so, you'll see a message telling you what you need to do.

Note: If the installation is interrupted for any reason, you can restart the update from where you left off by going back to the Store and downloading the update again.

Restart

After the update is downloaded and the first phase of the installation is complete (which could take between 15 minutes and a few hours, depending on your system and your connection speed), you'll see a message telling you that your PC needs to restart. It will give you 15 minutes to finish what you’re working on, save your work, and close your apps, and then it will restart your PC for you. Or you can restart it yourself.

Important : If you leave your PC before it's ready to restart, be sure to save your work and close any desktop apps you're using to make sure you don't lose anything when it restarts automatically. Your PC might need to restart more than once, depending on how it’s set up, and whether additional updates are needed.

Restarting will take longer than usual—from 20 minutes to about an hour—while the update is applied. During this time, you won't be able to use your PC.

 

In our next edition: Install Windows 8.1 Update 1

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Special Feature: How to Upgrade to Mac OS X Yosemite

If you haven’t decided whether to upgrade yet or not, please review the last edition of our newsletter at www.computerkindergarten.com/011815.html

How to Upgrade to Mac OS X Yosemite

By Jennifer Kyrnin of laptopmag.com

The latest version of Mac OS X 10.10 (Yosemite) offers a lot of new features, including a new design and the ability to make iPhone calls from your browser. Fortunately, this upgrade won’t cost you much time or any money. Click on this link to learn how you can upgrade to Yosemite from OS X Snow Leopard (10.6.8) or higher:

http://blog.laptopmag.com/upgrade-to-os-x-yosemite

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Today's Topic: Speed Up a Slow Computer - Uninstall Unused Programs

As your Windows computer ages, its speed can decrease. You will notice an increase in response time when you give commands to open programs, files or folders, use the Internet and other tasks. There are several things you can do to speed up your computer.

Over the next several editions of this newsletter, we will present articles discussing some of the steps you can take to speed up your slow computer.

Important: before making any changes to your system, always create a Restore Point. If anything goes wrong with the changes you make, this will allow you to revert back to a point when the computer was operating correctly. Please visit our Newsletter Archives to read our article, All About Restore Points:
http://computerkindergarten.com/restorepoints.html

Uninstall Unused Programs

When you install a program on your computer, a connection is created between the program and the operating system. Even if you never use the program, it can slow down the computer.

Your computer may have programs on it that you installed and no longer use or programs that came packaged with it that you never even opened. Instead of allowing them to slow things down, get rid of them.

Uninstalling a Program in Windows Vista / 7

The uninstall feature in Windows XP and Vista are somewhat similar. In Vista, click the Start Orb (bottom left) and open Control Panel. Click Control Panel Home on the left.

Under Programs, click on Uninstall a program. This will open the Uninstall or change a program window. It may take a few moments to completely populate the list.

Once all the programs are listed, scroll down and find the one you want to uninstall. Click on it to select it. Once you select it, you will see the word Uninstall appear on the blue bar above the list of programs. Click it. Windows will display a box asking for your permission to continue. Click the Continue button.

Another window should display asking you if you want to uninstall the program. Click Yes. The uninstall wizard will start up, and begin to uninstall. Depending on the program that you are uninstalling, the uninstall wizard may ask you to click OK at steps throughout the process. Just follow the instructions on the screen.

This will remove the program from your computer.

Uninstalling a Program in Windows XP

Click the Start button, choose Control Panel, and choose Add or Remove Programs.

Select the program to be removed; click the remove button. Depending on the program you select to be removed, you may be prompted to confirm the removal, or Windows Uninstaller Wizard may just start up to begin the uninstallation.

Uninstalling a Program in Windows 8/8.1

Go to the Desktop
Right click to open the Power User Tasks Menu (Windows logo, bottom left), and open Control Panel. Click Control Panel Home on the left.

Under Programs, click on Uninstall a program. This will open the Uninstall or change a program window. It may take a few moments to completely populate the list.

Once all the programs are listed, scroll down and find the one you want to uninstall. Click on it to select it. Once you select it, you will see the word Uninstall appear on the blue bar above the list of programs. Click it. Windows will display a box asking for your permission to continue. Click the Continue button.

Another window should display asking you if you want to uninstall the program. Click Yes. The uninstall wizard will start up, and begin to uninstall. Depending on the program that you are uninstalling, the uninstall wizard may ask you to click OK at steps throughout the process. Just follow the instructions on the screen.

This will remove the program from your computer.

Uninstalling a Program with the Program’s Uninstall Function

Many programs come with their own uninstall program that will quickly remove programs from your computer. Some installers do not put their program on the Add/Remove list, so your next place to look is in the Start menu.

Find the program in All Programs in the Start menu and see if there is an item called Uninstall. If so, click on it and the Uninstaller will run. Follow any prompts that appear on the screen.

In our next edition, learn how to speed up your computer by turning off programs that start up automatically.

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Special Feature: iPad: Some New Features in iOS 8 - Safari

Zoom Out To Tab View in Safari
In Safari, you can zoom out all the way to tab view. Use the pinch gesture with two fingers to do so. If you've got a lot of tabs open you’ll get a quick preview of all of them.

Safari Tab Search Button
When you reach tab view, you'll see a Search button on the top-left. It searches tab titles, so just enter the name of the website or title to find the right one.

Reader View in Safari
Safari has a nice feature which removes excess links and ads from websites to make them easier to read and navigate. If Reader View is available on any website, Safari now shows three horizontal lines on the left side of the address bar. Just tap the three horizontal lines to activate it. In the new version of the webpage, you can increase or decrease font if you like. Tap the big A button at the top of the page to increase text size and the small button to reduce it.

Request Desktop Site
Some mobile websites are awful. Tap the address bar and your bookmarks will open; swipe down and you'll see Request Desktop Site. Tap it to open the full website.

Scan Credit Card
Open a shopping website or any webpage with a form for filling credit card details. Safari will show you an option called Scan Credit Card above the keyboard. Tap it to take a picture of the credit card and have Safari key in the details for you.

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Websites of Interest:

Martin Luther King, Jr.

Take a look at the Seattle Times website for stories, photo, some audio clips and a very interesting Civil Rights timeline.
seattletimes.nwsource.com/mlk/

The Stanford University website provides a biography and some of his speeches and letters.
http://mlk-kpp01.stanford.edu/

From Louisiana State University, this website provides a biographical sketch and much more information.
http://tinyurl.com/lxztp9x

From Time Magazine, profile, photo, and timeline of the civil rights leader.
www.time.com/time/time100/leaders/profile/king.html

Listen to King's I Have a Dream speech given on August 28, 1963.
http://tinyurl.com/yaqwfqx

For the Kids:
familyeducation.com/topic/front/0,1156,1-4644,00.html
www.holidays.net/mlk/